Life Begins…

This is the message I prepared for the people of Lakes Entrance on the occasion of the fortieth anniversary of the Uniting Church in Australia

Logo - UCA

Ezekiel 37:15-28; Psalm 122; Hebrews 13:1-8; John 17:20-26

Today we celebrate the fortieth anniversary of The Uniting Church in Australia.  The UCA, as the cool kids call it, was formed on 22nd June 1977 when many congregations of the Methodist Church of Australasia, the Presbyterian Church of Australia, and the Congregational Union of Australia came together under an agreement formalised in a document called the Basis of Union.  As a denomination of Christianity in Australia we number around a quarter of a million enrolled members, and we gather in approximately two and a half thousand congregations.  A recent Australian Census noted that over one million people identified some sort of association with the Uniting Church, and that on any given Sunday, (including Ordinary Sunday 12) around ten percent of them will be in church.   So, congratulations for being here today, you and over one hundred thousand other Aussies are part of something big.

 I introduced this topic to you last week, saying that today, (or last Thursday at least, the actual 22nd of June) is not just a date on a calendar, rather today is a reminder of the century-long effort of Australasian Protestants to form a new nation and a new expression of Christianity for that nation.   The movement toward a union of Protestant Australians began alongside, and indeed amidst, the movement toward federation of the Australasian colonies in the 1880s and 1890s.  That Australia was declared a Commonwealth of States in 1901, and the Uniting Church was not declared until 1977, in no way undermines the work of the women and men who saw this vision and worked hard to make it so.  As with the work toward federation of the colonies, conversation partners came and went from the church and the final union was not the one first sought.  The Anglican Church was part of our early conversations but they ultimately stepped back (on orders from London), just as New Zealand ultimately stepped away from talks of national federation.

The Uniting Church was one of the first Australian churches to grant self-determination to its Aboriginal members, and if you hang around at Synod you’ll hear this over and over.  The Uniting Aboriginal and Islander Christian Congress (UAICC) has responsibility for oversight of the ministry of the Church with the Indigenous people of Australia and there are between 10,000 and 15,000 people involved.  It’s no surprise then that the Uniting Church has taken stances on issues of Native Title and the Environment, as well as the status of refugees in Australia and, more recently, in detention offshore.

Uniting, which used to be called UnitingCare is the largest operator of general social care activities in Australia, including being the largest operator of aged care facilities. It continues to serve in the ways he did in generations past with ‘central missions’; shelters and emergency housing for men, women, and children; family relationships support; disability services; and food kitchens for underprivileged people.

The Uniting Church is committed to ecumenism and to the fullest expression of God’s desire for unity among all people.  The Uniting Church has a formal, covenantal relationship with the UAICC, and we also promote multiculturalism and intercultural activities and relationships between and across our congregations.  We want to be present and fully engaged when God pours out God’s spirit on women and men, young and old, urban and rural, local and tourist, rich and poor; Koori and Islander and Pasifika and European and Asian and African and American and all combinations of the same.  We have congregations which are now into their second generation of operation in various East and South East Asian languages, Pacific Islander languages, and of course in Australian Indigenous languages.  I have worshipped with several communities where the spoken parts of the service (including the prayers) was in Yolngumata; where the only English spoken was my bit and some (but not all) of the songs.  In the twenty-first century, the Uniting Church has begun to host congregations speaking African languages, such as Dinka which is spoken in Sudan.

We are an expression of church with an open purpose, a uniting church desiring a united church, and we understand that the work of bringing out unity is our work which we undertake with God’s guidance and God’s strength.

In Ezekiel 37:21-23 God says that God will reverse the dispersion of God’s chosen people, gathering them to one place and I shall make them one people with one government.  They shall never again be divided from each other.  I shall be their God, their only God, and they shall be my people I have already spoken of the vision of one (Protestant) Church for one modern nation which burned strong in the hearts of many of the Fathers of Federation.  (Sadly, we’re not often told what the Mothers thought, but I’m confident that what we see now in Australia and the Uniting Church would not be seen if it weren’t for wives, sisters, daughters, suffragists and voters agitating where they did.)  That which had caused tension and fracture between the Judahites and the Israelites in Ezekiel’s day would be offered to God for healing and restoration, and God would be praised with a unified voice as a witness to the reunited nation.  Ezekiel would have us know that God is in the business of restoration of broken ties: God desires to see unity, brother-sisterhood going forward, and jobs and growth.  The secularists among the federalists were left in no doubt that God was not opposed to them: Australia was never intended by its founders to be a tower of Babel, and God has never seen us like that.  God approves of unity.

In today’s lectionary Psalm, 122, all the people of God, from all the tribes, go up together to Jerusalem to worship God.  While there they pray for the nation, the capital, the rulers and the government, and for the prosperity of the nation.  This is indeed a prosperity gospel, “O Lord make our nation great so that we might serve you more effectively,” they pray.  “If we live in the place where you are blessing us Lord, then we know that you are being served in the way you desire and that you will be happy.”  Our human desire for peace and prosperity, (which is the motto of the State of Victoria), is ultimately for God’s glory because such things, peace and prosperity, are only possible when God’s will for the nation and the church is fully implemented by the worshipping people.  God approves of prosperity.

In Hebrews 13:1-8 we hear God’s desire for the continuation of mutual love and hospitality to strangers.  Last week in that epic sermon about ordinariness I spoke of the hospitality of Abraham and Sarah to the men at Mamre: well the passage following that story in Genesis 18 is about God’s judgement upon the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, two cities which were destroyed because they were decidedly inhospitable to the nomadic family of Lot.  So, we already know from Jewish tradition that God is very much in favour of hospitality, and that God gets all fire and brimstone-ish when guests and strangers are treated poorly.  And then we are commended to remember those who are in prison or are undergoing torture, in Hebrews 13:3, prompting our prayers for our fellow Australians in gaol, and for our fellow Christians undergoing ill-treatment across the world because of their faith and witness to the God of Unity.  That desire for common concern leads the writer to the Hebrews to write of regard for marriage, that those who are married would stay married in that special relationship of unity which God has ordained; and regard for money where greed can destroy relationships.  We readers are reminded pray for our leaders, those women and men who are responsible for holding unity in place through their governance.  Today in East Gippsland, in Victoria, in Australia we remember the queen, the various governors, premiers, ministers, mayors and councillors. Today we remember Elizabeth, Peter Cosgrove, Linda Dessau, Malcolm Turnbull, Daniel Andrews, and Joe Rettino.  We remember our church leaders, Stuart McMillan, Sharon Hollis, Jim Murray and each member of the councils and standing committees of the Uniting Church they chair.  We pray for Collen Geyer, and Mark Lawrence who serve as General Secretary to each of Assembly and Synod; for those serving as Presbytery Ministers in Gippsland; and for those who serve our local congregation as Elders, office bearers, and members of Church Council.  Whatever we think of these women and men as individuals, and whatever we think of the Westminster System of government or the modified Presbyterian system of church governance, each of these people has as his or her primary purpose the preservation of unity in our nation, state, district, and church.

And in John 17:20-25 we read, once more, Jesus’ great prayer for the unity of those who believe in him as the Word of God Made Flesh.  As the Son is united with the Father in that perichoretic dance of Trinity so may the Church be one global mosh-pit of laughter, limbs and love.  Our greatest witness to the world on the periphery of our great dance, indeed our great challenge and our great invitation, is that we enjoy being with each other.  I’m not saying that church should always be fun, sometimes we must be solemn and there are times for mourning and lament; but I am saying that church should always be welcoming.  Church if it is to reflect Christ should never exclude, but should always include.  Church if it is to reflect Christ should never divide but always invite and call into unity.  I don’t care what you think, but that’s what Jesus thinks, and that’s good enough for me. 😊

So where too from here?  Well I think the answer is obvious, we keep working for unity.  As Australians, we know we live in a comparably safe, comparably settled, comparably unified nation.  There has never been a civil war here, nor an uncivil one.  We know New Zealand is never going to join our Federation, (although it is seriously about time the Baptists and Churches of Christ get their act together and join the Uniting Church),😊 but as a Church which does not tolerate difference but embraces it and celebrates the God colours and flavours brought into our gathering by old neighbours and new friends we are always looking for more.  Through the abovementioned UAICC and Uniting, through Frontier Services, through our Uniting Church schools, congregations, and fellowship groups, our desire continues to be met in those who are being added daily to our number, those who are being saved and those who are being welcomed out of the cold and into the dance.

If the old saying is true, and that life begins at forty, then I wonder what it is that will end in the Uniting Church this week.  Perhaps we need resurrection, renewal, revival, re-invigoration, or even resuscitation: but the Uniting Church in Australia, and especially the Lakes Entrance Uniting Church, is not in need of removal or recycling.

“Jobs and growth”, “moving forward”, we are a people on the march and a pilgrim people at that.  Saints of God wave high those banners of red, black, and white, you’ll want to be in our number!

Amen.Logo - UCA

It’s All A Bit Ordinary (Pentecost 2A and Ordinary Sunday 11A)

This is the text of the message I prepared for Lakes Entrance Uniting Church for Sunday 18th June 2017.

Genesis 18:1-15

Today is the day between days.

Today is the “Easter Saturday” of June.  It’s not the “Holy Saturday”, the day between God’s Friday and Resurrection Day when we sit in vigil awaiting the return of our Lord in triumph from his ravaging of Hell.  No, today is not that day.  Today is “Easter Saturday”, the Saturday at the end of Easter week when the moment of resurrection and chocolate has passed, the bunting is looking frayed, the coloured foil detritus from our body weight in refined sugar is looking on accusingly, and it’s all a bit silly now that we are still naming the days at all.

Of course, it is not Easter Saturday at all.  For starters, today is Sunday.  For seconders, it is the second Sunday after Pentecost, so we’re not even in the Easter season any more.  The liturgical directory suggests that our chapel should be dressed in green, not white, if we even bother with such things, because today is really nothing special.

Last week was Trinity and we celebrated the three-in-one nature of our God.  I spoke of how God is made of different stuff to us, and of how Jesus set aside the stuff of God to be shaped and embodied in the stuff of humanity.  I also spoke of how Jesus’ being shaped of human stuff means that God knows what it is to experience human emotions like grief, pain, risk, death, and restoration.  Stirring stuff.

The week before last was Pentecost and we celebrated the birth of the Church in wind, fire, exultant worship, and inter-racial, intra-faith extravagant declaration of the salvific purposes of God in the world.

Next week we will celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the Uniting Church.  Nor just a date on a calendar but a reminder of the century-long effort of Australasian Protestants to form a new nation and a new church for that nation.  We will remember that while church union occurred seventy-six years after the federation of our six colonies the desire of our forebears had been there all along.  We will remember them.

Wondrous days!  Hallelujah!  Our God reigns!  Our God pours out God’s spirit on women and men, young and old, urban and rural, local and tourist, wealthy and povertous; Euro and Asian and Koori and Anglo and African and American and all combinations of the same.  Our God takes on human form to reveal to us the wonder of God’s self, God’s ways, God’s nature, God’s plans, and our worth and value in God’s eyes.  Our ancestors responded to this great unifying vision of God the perichoretic one and sought in the birth of a new nation, with a continent for a country and a country for a continent, an expression of Church to match this great drive forward into the wonderful twentieth century of Victorian enterprise (by which I mean the age and its dear queen) and Victorian victory (by which I mean the feats of that wondrous colony, the jewel in her majesty’s crown, Marvellous Melbourne and Australia Felix betwixt the Murray’s River and Bass’s Strait).

Heady days to come next week!

And then there’s today!!  “The Second Sunday After Pentecost: Ordinary Sunday 11, Year A”. Doesn’t the very name of this day set your heart aflame?  Think of those great words of encouragement I spoke to you last month, which I first heard in the global head offices of the Church Missionary Society, CMS, in Waterloo in London, in June 2001.  “God, you have ignited a spark within each of us, now dear Lord we pray, water that spark!”

[Snort.]

Hmm.  I dunno about you but if anything is going to “water my spark” it is the thought of “The Second Sunday After Pentecost: Ordinary Sunday 11, Year A.” I mean, it isn’t even the Queen’s Birthday long weekend.  And at least you people only hafta show up; I’m supposed to build an engaging service of worship around this profound and lofty concept and to write a sermon to make it sound interesting.  (How am I doing so far?)  I mean, you know that I came straight to you from University.  I have more degrees than a compass, but I’ll admit it, I am desperately searching for God’s direction for today.  Today is the most boring Sunday in June.

So how are you feeling?  A bit ordinary?  Me too.

[Sigh, big blowing exhale.]

[Pause].

[Slap lectern.]

Righto then, let’s look at the scripture passage selected for this auspicious day in the lectionary.

Bang!  [Clap, thumb up.]

In Genesis 18:1-15 we read one of the most mind-blowingly unordinary stories in the Bible.  It jumps straight in at Genesis 18:1 with: The LORD appeared to Abraham by the oaks of Mamre as he sat at the entrance of his tent in the heat of the day.  It’s a hot day.  Now this is a Bible story and as such it’s set in Palestine, so it’s always a hot day.  For the Bible to indicate that it was a hot day suggests that it was a very hot day.  Not ordinary hot this day is stupidly hot.  It’s also the hottest part of this sweltering day, and Abraham is sitting in the door of his tent, trying to get respite from the hot sun in that little bit of breeze and shade.   The tent has been raised near the oak trees, so I’m suggesting there’s some shade and some water available.   Abraham is 99 years old, we know this because a year later when Isaac is born he’s 100.  This is not a question of theology, it’s maths.  I don’t have a degree in Maths but I’m pretty sure what a century minus a year looks like in numbers.  So, it’s sweltering, it’s the hottest time of the day, and Abraham is very old.  And as I have just told you, he is sitting in the shade.  And while all this ordinary stuff is happening the LORD appears.

Now, Ordinary Sundays aside: if I be chillin outside me tent on a scorcher of a day, and the LORD appears, that would probably spark my water, let me tell you.  There is nothing ordinary about God showing up in the form of three men looking for a cold one each and a bit of a sit down.  Of all the things on my list of what is ordinary, and then referring to the special category of what might be expected on an afternoon in summer, God showing up looking for a drink is not on that list.  God showing up like that is unexpected.  To say the least.  And since you’ve not employed me as your preacher to say the least I’m going to say some more.  Let’s read on.

Genesis 18:2 tells us that Abraham (99 and hot, but not in the good way) runs(!) from the shade and into the sun(!) to meet the men (who are the actual LORD).  As you do: when the LORD appears.

In Genesis 18:3-5a Abraham invites “my lord” to stay, note that he’s speaking in the singular here, and in Genesis 18:5b they (plural) agree to do so.  Now this is actually not extraordinary, you would expect Abraham and Sarah to show this depth of hospitality to strangers, and for strangers to think nothing of this extravagance, since that was the cultural norm.  Travelling strangers in the desert, no matter who they are, even enemies, are to be given food, water, shelter, and provision for the road if they pass by your camp.  Even so the sexes don’t mix so Sarah has done the baking but she stays away from the secret men’s business going on in the shade.  So, what we read in Genesis 18:6-9 is not remarkable, other than that it is the LORD who is the guest.

In Genesis 18:10 we are told that one of the men suggests that Sarah will become pregnant and give birth to a son within the next year.  Okay so that’s extraordinary, not part of the ritual of being a guest, but there you go.  The man doesn’t mention Sarah’s age, but the Bible does: and it makes no bones about it.  In Genesis 18:11 the point is made three times, just in case you didn’t get it the first time, that Sarah is each of “old”, “advanced in years”, and “that it had ceased to be with Sarah after the manner of women”.  So, she’s old, anciently old, and the menopause was a distant memory.  So that’s pretty ordinary; I mean old women, especially very old women, tend not to be fertile.  Thank you Captain Obvious whomever wrote Genesis 18:11 for making that clear, and in such a poetic manner!   So you can see why Sarah has a chuckle about it, very much derisory in tone as well.  “What are my chances, at my age, of getting lucky with that fossil I am married to?’ she asks in Genesis 18:12.  She may have no ova left, but she’s a feisty one is our Sarah.  Anyway, the LORD asks Abraham in Genesis 18:13-14 why Sarah laughed, again observing the code of dignity by which a male stranger doesn’t speak to a female, (so the LORD doesn’t actually ask Sarah), and declares that the LORD can do as the LORD desires.  In Genesis 18:15 Sarah says I did not laugh and the LORD, in full pantomime fashion and in breaking character for a second says to her oh yes you did! And then the story ends.

What an extraordinary story for an Ordinary Sunday!

And this of course has been my point all along.  There is no such thing as an ordinary Sunday.  Yes, there are days on our calendar which are not unique as anniversaries, although I’m sure that with today being June 18th it’s important for millions of people in millions of ways regardless of today’s being a Sunday or the Sunday between Trinity and the UCA anniversary.  But it doesn’t have to be Pentecost for us to expect the Spirit to fall upon us, or to rise up within us.  The LORD is welcome here, now, today, on Ordinary Sunday 11.  Isn’t he?  And would today still be considered ordinary if God were really present here today?  Or if the Word of God came to one of you with a word of promise for the future?  I’m sure 91 year old NNN in our congregation today would not be the only one baffled if a baby were promised to her nine months from now, but what if God promised her a resurgence of love and energy in her spirit to complete the work she was allocated as a Christian?  What if God spoke directly to 90 year old NN with a message that he was to see a new multi-million-dollar audio-visual suite set up in a new auditorium on this site, and that not only would he see it happen but that NN himself would be the one in the crawlspace in the ceiling connecting it all up?  If God promised it, would you believe it?  Would your response be like Sarah’s and to laugh behind God’s back; or would your response be like Mary’s and to ask for details and then praise God at the wonder of your being chosen for such a momentous task?

But let’s not get carried away with such big dreams.  No seriously, I’m not about to criticise here.  Let’s consider how excitingly small the promises of God can be.   I’m gonna suggest that NNN doesn’t need a baby, but she might have been praying for perseverance and strength.  I’m not going to say she needs perseverance and strength, that’s for her to discern.  But do we have faith that God can do small miracles on a Sunday?  Do we trust for the gift of faith, “that shy hope in the heart”, that God will come through for us in whatever it is we are praying and believing for?  Or do we have the attitude that if NN doesn’t throw away his crutches right now and backflip up the aisle, all the while speaking in tongues, that we’re not interested?

So, today is an ordinary Sunday.  Every Sunday is, even the ones with special names.  Because every Sunday is the Lord’s Day, not just in recognition that it is the weekly anniversary of the resurrection of the saviour (which it is) but that every day belongs to the LORD because as Genesis 1 tells us every day was made by the LORD, each day with its own purpose, even for purposeful rest.

Truly, the only extraordinary thing about any given Sunday, including this one, is that the Christians do not expect God to do the amazing.  If the LORD is amongst us then the miraculous is to be anticipated.

Every.  Single.  Day.

Amen.

Just If I’d…By Faith (Romans 5:1-8)

A Prayer of Confession

 O Lord, how we love a good boast!

As Christians, we love how our boasting brings you glory!!

We suffer with patience,

and are patient in our endurance.

Our hope is that our character

will prove this intolerable suffering

was worthwhile.

 

We are proud of our scars Lord,

the evidence of trials unseen,

(but oh, let me testify to how brave

I was…umm…of course for Jesus’ sake.  Of course.)

 

Thank you for your endurance, Lord.

For the ways in which you were patient

as we noisily endured,

racking up our Frequent Martyr Points.

 

Thank you for peace with God,

made obvious to us by the work of Jesus Christ

in revealing God’s truest nature as love beyond dimension.

 

Thank you that while we were sinners,

that God died for us,

thinking only of us,

and that the words of Christ from the cross

were of pity for us and not for himself.

 

Thank you for the assurance,

that you’d do it again if it were necessary,

which it isn’t,

but you’d never know from all the

pious whining.

Amen.

Extraordinary Day (Psalm 116:1-2, 12-15)

I love you God: I love that you hear me when I try to speak with you.

Especially when I try to speak with you but my words fail me because I have been ill.

Because you listen to me and delight to hear me,

I will continue to speak to you and speak with you.

 

And I will listen, in case you want to speak to me.

 

What else can I give you?  What do I have that you don’t have?

What do I have that you could possibly need?

All that I can truly offer you is my desire to receive more from you.

All that I can truly offer you is my desire to love you more,

and for others to love you because they have seen you and known you

as I have seen and known you.

I want my worship to be overheard, not that I become famous as a worshipper

or wordsmith:

but that the content of my worship, the story of my salvation,

the litany of my thanksgiving should be heard;

and that the evidence of that which has not yet been seen by others

should be made audible to them.

 

Your care of me is so apparent to me.

Your love of me has never been more real.

It is truly shocking how intimately you know me and

the degree to which you love me.

 

I have been known by God in the Biblical sense,

and this is what you have desired for each of your daughters and sons.

 

This is an extraordinary day.

But, then every day is when you are near, Lord.

 

Amen.

Through Matthew (Matthew 9:35-38)

Father, through Matthew you tell us that

Jesus went out:

teaching and preaching,

healing and raising,

revealing and praising.

And then he went to the next town and did the same again.

 

Father, through Matthew you tell us that

Jesus had compassion.

Enduing the crowds

and curing the crowded.

Shepherding the lost

and gathering the blest.

 

Father, through Matthew you tell us that

Jesus needs assistance.

Here we are: send us.

 

Amen.

Whoosh!

This is the text of the message I prepared for the people of God at Lakes Entrance Uniting Church for Sunday 4th June 2017.  It was the Day of Pentecost.

Numbers 11:23-30; Acts 2:1-21; Psalm 104:27-30; 1 Corinthians 12:4-11.

Last week when I spoke with you about Ascension as a forgotten festival I mentioned that it’s the more Evangelical churches, which are more often low-church in style, who overlook this event.  Today is Pentecost and of course Evangelicals love this one.  But like Ascension, Pentecost is not known to the world, and like Ascension we Christians can go about our business today safe in the knowledge that the Secular Humanists are not insisting upon equal rights for bunnies, bilbies, or fat men in red suits.  (Mind you, this being Pentecost there’s nothing wrong with being a fat man in a red shirt at all!)  Yet today is also a forgotten festival, or so it seems, in some parts of the Church; and those parts of the church, somewhat surprisingly, are the Pentecostal movements.

I used to belong to a church which was Pentecostal in orientation; and even though our senior pastor didn’t like that title for its negative connotations, we were a congregation where the Spirit was welcomed and allowed sovereignty.  But while we certainly celebrated Christmas on its nearest Sunday, and Easter Day on Sunday (but not Friday), I don’t remember us ever celebrating Pentecost despite it always falling on a Sunday.  I guess when you belong to a fellowship where the arrival of the Holy Sprit in the worship time is a weekly occurrence, and the gifts of the Spirit Godself, and as released through the people, are expected and desired, you don’t need to set aside one particular Sunday to celebrate the Spirit.  After all, if you don’t expect the Spirit on the other 51 Sundays in the year, what are you doing?  In other words, if you are always Pentecostal, who cares really what happens on the seventh Sunday after Easter?

It’s actually a good question, but I don’t think it has just one answer.  Of course, we want Holy Spirit to be here each week, and in our town each day of the week, including today.  But that’s not enough of a reason for me to not celebrate the anniversary of this momentous occasion in the history of the world.

When I lived in Darwin the pastor of the local Assemblies of God church drove the sort of car that many men would drool over.  It was a black XR8 ute, so a V8 Falcon with big wheels, narrow tyres, a rorty exhaust, and everything that screamed “boy racer”.  The local Uniting Church minister at the time drove a platinum VRX Limited Edition (brackets Series One end brackets).  So, a Magna V6 with bigger wheels, narrower tyres, and a far rortier note than a standard Magna, or even the standard VRX.  It also had red leather seats.  It wasn’t as cool as the XR8, but the VRX was still pretty cool.  Both ministers had personalised rego plates on these cars, the Uniting Church bloke had his name “REV.ROB”, which was pretty self-explanatory and went with his other job as track chaplain at Hidden Valley Motorsports Park, home of Darwin’s round of the V8 Supercars plus weekly dirt squirts, motorcycles, and even speedboat races in the Wet Season.  The AoG pastor had “WHOOSH”.  I was present when Rev Rob, my dad, asked his colleague in ministry about the rego plate.  “Whoosh?” says Rob, “that the sound of an XR8 flying past you?” “Nah mate,” replied the pastor, “Acts 2:2, mate, whoosh!”  So, there you go, Pentecostal people do know about the sound of the Spirit first descending upon the Church in might and power.

And many of you know, because you’ve met him, that Rev Rob now drives an orange XR6 bearing his “REV.ROB” plates now in SA rather than NT form.  The legendary VRX is sitting out the front of this building today.  Orange paint job in one place, red leather seats in this place, don’t let anyone tell you the Uniting Church doesn’t do power from on high!!

But, as with many stories of God acting powerfully in the life of Jesus or the first three generations of Church as recorded in the scriptures, these are not the first times this happened.  Whoosh! is also a sound familiar to the Hebrews, and rightly so.  In our reading from Numbers 11 this morning Joy told us of how when Ruach ha-Qodesh rested upon the seventy they prophesied loudly.  Even those not in the gathering, but who had been chosen, prophesied while the spirit was present above the tent of meeting.  We are not told of fire or wind, perhaps the evidence of the cloud’s descent was enough, but certainly there was noise as seventy men shouted aloud the news of God’s sovereign glory and God’s desire for the world as it was to be related through the Abrahamic people. Moses’ prayer for the people was that everyone would carry the authority of God in this way, not just the seventy men and not only while the cloud was descended upon the group.  Moses saw that the Spirit had been given without limit, Moses certainly didn’t lose power by God taking from him to share with the seventy.  Moses understood, and we understand now, that when God blesses a people with power and authority for the work of proclamation there is more than enough empowering spirit for everyone to be filled to overflowing.

In the centuries after the arrival of the Hebrews in the land given to them by God as a base from which to tell of God’s glory to the world, the settled people continued to hear from the wind of wisdom and holiness, Ruach ha-Qodesh.  The Psalmist wrote in 104:27-30 that the world is entirely dependent upon God’s sustaining presence.  You shall send forth your spirit and they shall be created, and you shall renew the face of the earth says 104:30 in the wording of the New King James Version.  God’s creative act by the Wise and Sacred Spirit is an act of renewal, not only of creation.  The Spirit does more than the activity of brooding in Genesis 1:2, the Spirit is active in renewing and refreshing the creation; therefore, the activity must take place more than once.  Like Pentecost, which the Church believes was not a once-and-only event, so Jewish tradition in the Torah and the Ketuvim, the Law and the Writings of scripture, attests that God continues to send the Spirit when the Spirit is required.  We are to expect the Spirit and welcome the Spirit when the Spirit comes, because the Spirit is sent by God to meet our need for God.

The gifts which are given by God through the Spirit are as diverse as the needs of the Church in the world.  Paul instructs the Church at Corinth in this, saying that prophecy and prayer language are not enough: many human needs would be left unmet if God sent prophets and interpreters, but no one else, into the world.  Each need therefore has its corresponding ministry, God’s response to that need, and each ministry has its corresponding gift, God’s empowering for the work of that ministry.  Paul addresses the matter from the other side in saying that every gift has its corresponding ministry, in part because the Corinthians were so fascinated by the extravagant work of God amongst them that they had forgotten to utilise the enabling of God to conduct and complete the work of God.  Each gift has its corresponding minister who brings the gift to remedy the need with the presence of God.  It follows then that different gifts are given to different people for them to use in different situations in the world.  No two Christians are identical in their make-up, nor should they be.  We are each unique and all complimentary, designed to work together, to fit together.  Since no Christian is exempt from the call to ministry, (I told you a few weeks ago that it is baptism which makes you a minister, not ordination), since no Christian is exempt from ministry all Christians are provided with the gifts required.  Women and men have gifts, not just men; girls and boys have gifts, not just boys; and of course, children and adults have gifts, not just adults.  New converts and life-long disciples have gifts, not just the decades old believers; ordained and lay have gifts, not just the ordained; and the same can be said for diversity in race, nationality, material wealth, health, marital status, and so on.  If you are a Christian you have gifts, because if you are a Christian you have ministries.

But of course, we know that not all gifts are prevalent in all people.  I actually believe that all Christians have all gifts, you’ve not been given a portion of the Spirit at your baptism but all of God, but I also believe that God only uses some of the gifts in each person to ensure that all of the gifts are expressed in the local church.  For example, not everyone in this room can preach, but in the very next breath I say that I am not the only person in this room who can.  You each have the fullness of the Spirit that I do, but only a few of us, me included, are called to use the gift of preaching.  And of course, the inverse is true where even as your minister, and whoever comes next to this place, ordained or not, is the same, there are things which God has not called me to do and I therefore cannot do as well as those of you whom God has called.  I have no idea what those things are, because I am incredibly gifted, but I’m sure there something someone here can do better than I could.  😊

Paul provides a list of gifts.  This list is not exhaustive, there are other gifts which Paul does not mention here.  I don’t think the unmentioned gifts are less important, it’s just that Paul is making a point and his point has been made.  It’s not all about the prophets and tongue talkers, he is saying, just look at all the other examples.  There are gifts of Wisdom (application of information) and Knowledge (insight to partner wisdom).  There are gifts of Faith (confident assurance for encouragement), Healings (note that this is plural), and Miracles.  Consider how Faith might work in a team with Healings and Miracles; that’s how it’s supposed to work.  There are gifts of Prophecy: (telling the truth with boldness), and of Discerning of Spirits (naming names for the purposes of directed response, perhaps by the prophet).  There are gifts of Prayer Language (for worship and intercession), and of Interpretation of prayer language (to partner with the pray-ers and the prophets).  And as I say there are many more.  I have been used by God in the ministry of Intercession in the past, which draws from the list just read but also needs further detailing, some of which is found in Ephesians 4:11-13.

The evidence is clear from the history of the people of God, from the time of Moses, the time of David, and the time of Paul that God is pouring out the Spirit on all humankind.  In his Pentecost Day sermon Peter declares the evidence of God’s action, and that it is God who is acting, is seen in the present day amongst those who are prophesying and speaking of visionary dreaming.  In other words, God’s people are speaking the truth clearly and with a deep and trustful hope for the future, even as Joel said they would in his day, Peter’s day, and on every day leading into the last days.  Again, no one shall be made exempt, not by age nor by social status, not by anything other than his or her unwillingness to act for God.  There will be no doubt what is happening, this will all clearly be the work of God, and those who see this and call out to God will be rescued by God from whatever and wherever they are lost in.

When the spirit falls, the truth is told and people are saved, healed, and restored.  Moses saw it in the desert, the 120 saw it in Jerusalem, and Paul writes of it to a church in a pagan city in Europe so they know what to expect and how to operate when it happens.

Are you ready?  Are you willing?

Then let’s have at it.

Amen.