The Psalm of The Lakes

This is the message I preached at Lakes Entrance on Sunday 13th August 2017, the tenth Sunday of Pentecost.

Psalm 105:1-6, 16-22; Romans 10:5-15

Last week I spoke to you something of the call to preaching, and how it’s more than just making your own sense of the Bible and then speaking about it from the front. Preaching is both a gift and a calling; those who are called are also gifted, but some who are gifted are not called. Some who probably could preach a good sermon, one without vampires for example, might be better suited as small group or classroom teachers or lecturers, or perhaps as theologians, which is to say authors.

In August and September 2000, I was in the final semester of my studies toward a Graduate Diploma in Primary Education. I was on “Practicum 3”, a four-week solid block of teaching in a school supervised by the university (NTU) and the regular classroom teacher. I was teaching a grade five class at Holy Spirit Primary School, a Roman Catholic parish school in Casuarina, a suburb of Darwin. Holy Spirit was one of two schools local to my home, the other was Wanguri Primary School and I had completed “Practicum 1” there twelve months earlier. The schools were diagonally across the road from each other, with that road marking the boundary between the suburbs of Casuarina and Wanguri. Anyway, one lesson where I was teaching Religion, (and remember that this is a Catholic School so Religion was taught twice a week by the classroom teacher and not one a term by local Christian volunteers bringing RE as it was at Wanguri), I found myself running short on time due to a last-minute assembly being called. I had to finish quickly and so instead of reading the Bible around the classroom as we usually did, each child reading one verse in turn, I read the passage from the front. And because I was in a hurry I acted it out too, reading with one hand and waving my other hand around. As we were lining up for assembly at the end of the lesson one of the girls said to me, “Mr Tann you shouldn’t be a teacher, you should be an actor.” I told her the truth, that I had used to be an actor and that now I was becoming a teacher, but that I still liked having fun with my learning. I also told her that I was a Christian from the Uniting Church and that I liked reading the Bible too, so that made it easier for me to have fun with it.

The reason I have told you that story is because the passage I read that day in class is the same passage I have read to you this morning, Psalm 105. Worship was opened this morning with my reading the first six verses directly from the Bible, and from the NRSV which you have in front of you. Our prayer of Adoration, which I called “The Adoration of Joseph” was not of course that Joseph is to be adored, but that Joseph would adore God because of the story of his life. I took Psalm 105:16-22 and rewrote those verses as my own prayer, much as Bruce D. Prewer, James Taylor, and Leslie F. Brandt do in the books I often use for our liturgical prayers.

This got me to wondering: how would Psalm 105 for Lakes Entrance read? The Psalm as we find it in Israel’s scriptures is subtitled “God’s faithfulness to Israel” by the NRSV translators, and “God’s word in Israel’s story” by Professor Toni Craven who is the commentator I read this week. This Psalm tells the story of the Hebrew people from the choosing of Abraham until the settling of the exodus people in the Promised Land under Joshua. It forms a pair with Psalm 106 which speaks of the unfaithfulness of the Hebrew people during the same time: God is faithful as deliverer, but the people act wickedly and are blind to what God had done (Psalm 106:6-7).

The opening verses of the Psalm of The Lakes would be easy to write: I hope so anyway. Give thanks to the LORD in prayer and praise, sing to God, tell of what God has done. Let all who do these things (pray, praise, sing, tell) do so in joy. Ask God with trust for strength and the capability to go forward into the promised future. In recent days remember what God has done for you, and done through you, since your last minister moved on. Tell the people who have joined this congregation, tell the people who will join this congregation next year. Not that we wish to revisit past hurts and pains, open old wounds, pick at old scabs, or point to the scars with every new person you meet. There is no need to get new people “up to speed” on past hurts. But having been where you have been, speak now of where God is and of God’s faithfulness to you seen only in hindsight. As I said to you last week, don’t preach your notes; rather, use what you have learned in the past season of darkness and turmoil to proclaim God’s greatness and the hope for the future.

On Friday coming, the profile for the Lakes Entrance Uniting Church Congregation will go before the Placements Committee at Synod in Melbourne. After so long in preparation and negotiation, drafting and redrafting, and re-redrafting your paperwork is in and the search for a new, permanent-for-at-least-three-years, minister gets underway. You have done it, you have made it. Of course, the search for a new minister takes the time that it does, and you will need to look after each other and take responsibility for the functions of the congregation until your new pastor comes; but considering what you have already done that will be easier. You have much to praise God for, to thank God, to look back in amazement at where God was and what God did for you, in you, through you, because of you, and sometime around you. You have a history which speaks of God’s choosing of you and God’s favour upon you. Today is the day to begin to celebrate that history, to speak of God’s faithfulness, and to consider God’s message for you as you look to appointing the man or woman God is sending you.

And so, as are the people of history at the end of Psalm 105, so you stand on the bank of the Jordan River. The Moses people of your history, those interim ministers and preachers who have brought you safely, (if somewhat shakily), to the brink of home are no longer required. The next woman or man you call will be a Joshua, one who can lead you and cheer you on as you run ahead to fill the promise that God has made to you.

Briefly I want to turn to Romans 10:5-15 at this point, and not just because I read it this morning and I haven’t preached on it. This passage from Paul, which is today’s Lectionary choice for Epistle, speaks not only of Moses and that same Salvation History of Israel which the paired Psalms 105 and 106 do, but also of what Christian Salvation is.

Paul quotes Moses from Deuteronomy 30:11-14 in saying that what is done in salvation can only be done by God: human effort will always fall short. At Lakes Entrance, you know that. Only God could have brought The Lakes Parish through to where you stand today. Paul is of course speaking of human salvation, the movement of an individual into a saving and salving relationship with God in Christ, but the same applies to this congregation made up of Lakes Entrance and Lake Tyers Beach people that God has done the work through grace, and that God’s soothing and rescuing work in your salvation is a sure and completed thing.

This then is what you can say to the world. Of course, should speak of what Christ has done for you, a Christian, in bringing you to himself as Lord of Life and pointing you towards the God of Creation. But in a town where the name of the Uniting Church was not proud, where people thought we had abandoned this building in preparation for selling up and moving out the story of how God saved the Uniting Church in Lakes Entrance is worth telling, and worth telling repeatedly. God loves this congregation, I am sure you have no doubt of that. God loves this town and this district, I am sure you have no doubt of that either. Now all you must do, and you needn’t wait for your next Reverend Gentleman or Lady, is to go and tell them on the Esplanade, and on every other street in this town, that God loves them too.

And feel free to be as extravagant as you like in doing so. Grade five would be proud of you, to say nothing of the Holy Spirit, Godself.

Amen.

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