Christ The King

This is the message I prepared for KSSM for Sunday 24th November 2019, the Sunday of Christ’s Kingship in Year C.  It was a communion service in both Kaniva and Serviceton in the Churches of Christ tradition, and I was presider

Jeremiah 23:1-6; Colossians 1:11-20; Luke 23:33-43

Well, the kingship of Christ is one of those ideas that divides many in today’s church. The use of such powerful language to describe such a humble man has caused offence for some, and the taking offence by those in contradiction to a clear and Biblical teaching has caused offence in others. It seems to me that to call Christ “King” sparks the same angst as to call God “Father”; what you think of kings depends upon your experience of monarchical government and what you think of fathers depends upon the relationship you had with your own dad. I’m happy with the idea of Jesus as King of Kings and Lord of Lords; I think him being President of Presidents or perhaps Mayor of Mayors is a bit pathetic really, Creation is not a democracy and we are not worse off for living in the Kingdom of Heaven, God’s own realm.

So there’s your introduction: Jesus is King and that’s a good thing in my view.

But what do we actually mean by this statement: Jesus is King, or perhaps Jesus is Lord? Is this just metaphorical language, suggesting that as we acknowledge Christ’s authority in the world we see him as superior to ourselves? If we want to say that Jesus is somehow better than us or above us in rank then why not just call him “teacher” (Rabbi as his mates called him), or even “boss”? Why king? Why lord?

Why not shepherd? Okay that might be a metaphor that even fewer modern people would enjoy, the logic suggesting that all Christians are sheep, but there are shepherd stories in circulation. Indeed the Roman Catholic parish in my hometown, the actual town where I was a child, is called “Christ the Good Shepherd”. Why does Jesus have to be a monarch, why can’t he be something more pasture-pastoral? In he opening verses of Jeremiah 23 The LORD who speaks through the prophet suggests that that is a useful framework for thinking about how God governs the people. In Jeremiah 23:3,4 God says that I myself will gather…and I will bring them back…and they shall not fear any longer…nor shall any be missing. That sounds like a God-thing, it certainly echoes the Good Shepherd motifs of Jesus’ teachings; and if we read on in Jeremiah we find that Jesus is apparently foretold as the king who will come, a descendent of David and one who will rule with wisdom, justice, and righteousness. Jesus will be king, and the sort of king he will be is this sort, the shepherding sort. The sort of king that Jesus will not be is the sort the Judahites and Israelites have already seen; the extortionate tyrant, the poor manager, the disinterested lush, the cashed-up bogan. That might be the style of Israel and Judah’s past, it may even be the style of Europe’s mediaeval, pre-Modern, pre-Revolutionary Past in our thinking, but it is not the way of the Kingship of God.

In today’s reading from the gospel we find ourselves at the crucifixion as Luke records it, and specifically the execution of the one the Romans called “The King of the Jews”. You’ll find those words in Luke 23:37-38. The implications of Jesus’ death are best left for another time, we’ll hear more about that at Easter, because today I want us to focus on the idea that this man is “The King of the Jews” and what it means that this king is being crucified.

You don’t need to be much of a scholar to know that lots of kings throughout all of history have ended up dead at the hands of their enemies. I’m not sure whether Jesus was the only foreign king ever crucified, but Rome would often murder the captured, defeated rulers of the lands they conquered after displaying them in triumphal parades through the city. Such kings or chieftains were usually strangled in a place called the Carcer, which is why many did not allow themselves to be “incarcerated” and would suicide or at least go down fighting on the battle field. Think of Cleopatra. But the Romans didn’t actually consider Jesus a king, did they? No, he was not King of Judea or King of Israel, he was not defeated in battle and he was not taken to Rome as part of a conqueror’s triumph: he was considered a rabble-rouser, a partisan, a rebel, and he was brutally killed in full public view to serve as an example for other trouble makers. Jesus was garbage according to the Romans, and even if Pilate thought Jesus himself harmless, Jesus was not worth upsetting the Sanhedrin over and so he was expendable. The sign above Jesus head was a taunt, a taunt of him and also a taunt of the Jewish people. And yet, and yet it is a title that Christians have invested with prophetic meaning almost since the day of crucifixion itself. Jesus really is the King of the Jews, and that is why his resurrection 36 hours later is such a victory for God’s Chosen People.

Jesus is not the sort of king who gets assassinated after a public rebellion, like Louis XVI of France or Charles I of Great Britain were. He’s never been overthrown and exiled as were Victor Emmanuel III of Italy or Alfonso XIII of Spain. After Jesus was killed Jesus returned; and Jesus was never de-throned. Look at how Jesus acts from the cross, he still has authority in his power to ask God to forgive sins (Luke 23:34) and to promise salvation to a repentant sinner (Luke 23:43); Jesus is King on the cross, not an ex-king or a deposed king, Jesus never relinquishes his kingship and it is never lost to him, even as he dies and is buried. And look at the people, in Luke 23:35 they stand watching at a distance while the Jewish leaders come close to mock Jesus’ kingship, the people are not following the leaders, which makes me wonder who has lost whose prestige at this point. Here’s a hint, you can’t call yourself a leader if you don’t have any followers.

When Paul speaks through his writing to Colossae about the Kingdom of God’s beloved Son I think this is the Son that Paul has in mind. Not just that Jesus is the Son of God, but that Jesus the Son is this crucified and raised King of the Jews. Look at Colossians 1:11-12 where Paul prays may you be made strong with all the strength that comes from his glorious power, and may you be prepared to endure everything with patience, while joyfully giving thanks to the Father. Our strength, God’s power, our preparation to endure with patience are gifts of God which Jesus lived out as an example on the cross. I’m not certain how Jesus felt in the moment, but if he knew that his work was for the salvation of the world (and he did) then he knew that it would bring delight to God, and that would have buoyed him I think. The same is true of us, who are followers of Jesus and as disciples are literally his students, and as Paul adds in Colossians 1:13 as citizens of the Kingdom of the Son. Our followship of Jesus, our community of discipleship, is founded on the nature and example of the king who endured the cross and displayed God’s power throughout all things (time, space, language) by rising again. That is the story of a king; to call Jesus “boss” or “mayor” is kinda pathetic really.

Paul goes on in his next paragraph, which our Bibles bookend as Colossians 1:15-20, in much the same way. The New Revised Standard Version subtitles this section “The Supremacy of Christ” which I think is a good take on it, even as I don’t really like subtitles. The one who is king, this saviour who saved through his own death and resurrection, the king of The Kingdom of God, is supreme. You’d better believe he’s supreme, he’s the image of God (well aren’t we all?) but he’s the prize of creation for whom all things were created, and he sits over every creature and every form of power and influence. Christ is king above every other king then, king of kings for sure. But more than above all things in rank he is amongst all things in shape, he’s between the sub-atomic spaces and he drives every bond and force of Physics and Chemistry. Christ is valency, Christ is gravity, Christ is inertia and magnetism. Christ is osmosis and reduction. Christ is the top, and in Christ is the whole made whole. Christ is source, Christ is purpose, Christ is fullness and Christ is incarnation through whom God in all God’s Godfulness acts in and on and with the created order. So, more than a president eh: so much more than a president, so much.

Jesus is pretty important then. Immense. But also close. Look at the last words of our Christian tradition reading today: through Christ God was pleased to reconcile to Godself all things in all dimensions by making shalom through the blood of Jesus’ cross. That’s Colossians 1:20. And think about it, Selah, pause and consider the blood of his cross. Did the cross bleed? Did the cross bleed? No. The blood of his cross is the blood of himself. There is no artificial miracle here of a cross bleeding true blood, there is no falsehood whereby sap was oozing and the illiterate peasants got all sweaty-faced about the magic. We all know what was going on here, Jesus, (Christ, the Supreme One, King of kings and all other things…) bled and died and through that God reconciled all things on Heaven and Earth and made peace. No king has ever done that before. Sure there have been abdications in world history, some rulers have surrendered immediately at the gates in the face of an overwhelming invasion force rather than have his (or her) city besieged and pillaged. But no king has ever died in such a way, at the hand of his own people, so as to bring about God’s completion. The greatest king died the most humble death, the least glorious death, nailed up naked and in public to a tree beside the main highway, having been thrashed to a pulp first, all on the twin crimes of treason and blasphemy, pronounced by a puppet governor and a selfish priesthood.

This is the king we have. Even if he were not king of kings and lord of lords (and he is, let’s not diminish that), but even if he wasn’t, even if there were a number of kings and Jesus-land was but one of a number of nations with constitutional monarchs in whose country we might live, wouldn’t you chose it anyway? I mean I like Elizabeth, Australia’s queen, but given a choice between the UK and the KOG I know where I’d be brexiting to…and it wouldn’t take me three years to make up my mind either.

The Kingship of Jesus seems to be to be the heart of the gospel. Even more than the lamb of God who was slain, even more than the great high priest who knows our every weakness, even more than the friend (what a friend) we have in Jesus, of most central importance to the good news of God is that God is King in the Kingdom of The Son, and that the king is the image of the invisible God. If God is king, and if God is like Jesus, and if Jesus is like this King of the Jews, then the Kingdom of God is the Kingdom of the most wonderful, most adorable, most loving and most welcoming king; a king who is all of that and strong, and authoritative, and commanding, and redeeming.

This, this is the God we adore; this, this is the God we serve.

Amen.

It’s All About The Good (Pentecost 6C)

This is the text of the message I prepared for KSSM for Sunday 21st July 2019.

In our story from the Hebrew Traditions today we come across a people bored with religion. This could be Australia in 2019 where much of the population just wants to set it aside all of those obligations of ritual to live the lives they want. “When will it be Monday,” they cry “when can we stop having to sit around (boring!) in our Sunday best and we can do what we want and play outside again?” Well obviously that’s not Australia in 2019; it was probably Australia in 1919 for most people but nowadays the shops are open, the parks are not patrolled by the fun police (who used to be actual police) and you can even buy a beer at the footy on Good Friday. But that’s not the case for Israel in the 700s BC, and their complaint goes even further: “why does God always have to be looking over our shoulder, when will God turn away so that we can fiddle the scales a bit and make a bit of extra in our margin?” So not just Sunday trading instead of church, but dodgy trading instead of honesty! But God remembered what the covenant stipulated (Amos 8:7) and God knows what should be expected of the chosen nation who are the light of God to the world, and God is not prepared to compromise the high standards of ambassadorship. God will remove the blessings due to the Chosen ones, those benefits that they have taken for granted (Amos 8:11-12) so that the people notice how bereft they are, the poverty of their own shame, and they will hunger for God again, but God will withhold divine favour from them just as they have withheld divine favour from the other nations of the world. This is utter devastation and the loss of all hope, the nation is beyond the point of salvation and it will be annihilated. There won’t even be prophecy any more in Israel; God has finished speaking to them.

As we saw last week, so this week, the Psalm connects with the theme and action of our reading from the prophets. Here the faithful one (this is a human voice, not God) speaks to the evil ones quizzing them on their evil. The people being accused are outright wicked, there is no pretence and there is no error here, the veil is blatant and is celebrated, boasted about. The retort comes in Psalm 52:5 where the faithful man says but God…, because God has seen and God will vindicate the true and hospitable manner of the chosen people. Evil will not win, injustice will not prevail, God will restore the world to the way it is supposed to be and God will tear away and remove completely anything or anyone that undermines the goodness of creation. And not only this but those who have stood firm for goodness will be delivered and will in their turn mock the downfall of the evil: Psalm 52:7 tells the whole story of why the destruction has come, and Psalm 52:8-9 tells the whole story of what should have happened in the first place. It cannot, surely, be made any clearer what God expects of us: take refuge in God, trust in God, and seek refuge nowhere else except in the steadfast and eternal love of God. Following that plea we see the response: if you depend on God so tightly and so completely then when God comes though, public worship will be thrust out of your spirit in a proclamation of thanksgiving and praise. God will destroy the self-reliant before they can destroy anyone else because of their wickedness, and God will rescue the faithful and deliver the ones whose trust and hope is in God, secure in God’s own knowledge that the faithful when delivered from the wicked will honour God with praise and obedience because The LORD is good.

Our reading from the Christian Traditions this week, just like our reading from the Hebrew Traditions, follows directly on from last week’s readings. Last week we read along with the Colossians as Paul praised them up and spoke back to them about the reputation he had heard that they were generous and hope-filled people, an exemplary church when it comes to displaying the likeness of God in action. Now Paul goes on to say more about the likeness of God, in that he describes Jesus for them. “I have heard that you have hope,” Paul tells the Colossians, “and that hope is centred in the redemptive, sin-destroying work of Jesus. Now let me tell you more about Jesus.” Jesus is the image of the invisible God says Paul in Colossians 1:15, he’s probably quoting a hymn that the Colossians already know and he’s about to explain what the lyrics mean. This is doctrine, it’s something to be learned and understood, but it’s also straightforward; there’s no philosophising or metaphors here but only direct information and that information is that what God is like is what we have seen Jesus to be like. We can’t see God, but we used to be able to see Jesus and we know what Jesus was like: well Christ is like what Jesus was like, and The Son is like The Father (I’m moving away from Paul’s wording here), so if you want to know the characteristics of God’s perspective remember Jesus.

It’s straightforward, there’s no metaphors here, but it’s not exactly simple to understand. Okay so God is like Jesus, patient and loving and compassionate and radically protective of the downtrodden against even the most scripturally literate religious leaders, but how does that actually work? How did Jesus get these characteristics? Well Paul goes on to tell his readers and hearers, and we can see for ourselves from Colossians 1:15b-20, that Jesus is special because Christ is an eternal partner with God in creation. Christ is the means of Creation (through him) the reason for Creation (for him) and the centre of Creation (in him all things hold together). In everything Christ is first, all of the fullness of God dwells in Christ, and through Christ all Creation is being reconciled with the Creator, including the Colossians who are creatures being drawn by Christ to reconciliation with God.

So that’s good stuff; again pretty straightforward in that there’s no metaphors, it’s all about what Christ is because he actually is those things. But it’s also rather heavy. All of that is what Jesus was? Jesus from Nazareth you mean, man with the beard and the nice smile, handy with a hammer and a water-filled wine bottle; all of that Christ stuff is him? Yes. And all of that crucifixion stuff, with pain and blood and a borrowed tomb, that’s Christ too? Yes, and more so than Christ too, that’s God in all of God’s Godness too. This is why Paul is so prescriptive, so picking up our story at Colossians 1:23, we read where Paul indicates that Christian salvation (salvation through unmitigated trust in Jesus the Christ) is effective only so far as your unmitigated trust never mitigating.

Go back to Psalm 52:7-9, the wicked are not destroyed because they are wicked, but because they are self-reliant in the places where they should have been God-reliant. The wickedness is a result of their self-reliance, not a cause, and the same is true of Christians. You can start good, beautiful in fact, but as soon as you begin to take God’s authority out of God’s hands and try to wield it yourself, even if only for yourself, you get broken. The brightest angel in Heaven, the most luminescent one named for light itself, was not immune to this sort of disaster: we all know what happened to Lucifer don’t we? And then as happened for Lucifer, and for the people of Amos 8 and Psalm 52, broken and deviated individual people began to break and hurt others, and lead them astray, and before long the whole world was in peril of destruction not because God was ready to smite the sinners but because the sinners were empowered and emboldened in their numbers by their own unmitigated sinfulness to break everything. God doesn’t smite sinners, they destroy each other; and they and we have done so in wave upon wave throughout history. No, God rescues sinners, and God does so in person through Christ: and yes I did say “does so” and not “did so”. Jesus died in the human past, but Christ continues to save, so he does, and so he shall continue to do until there are no sinners left. Ultimately there will be no sinners left; either every human life will individually have been redeemed and turned around by contact with the grace of God (so they’re not sinners anymore) or that life will have ultimately and completely destroyed itself in spite (and in flagrant denial) of contact with the grace of God. The choice for salvation is yours says Paul in Colossians 1:23, now that you have become aware of what God is like through awareness of who Jesus Christ is.

I said last week that I don’t think the destructive part of Amos’ message applies to us, and I specifically said that with reference to the Uniting Church. Of course I did not mean that God is going to annihilate the Churches of Christ and only the Churches of Christ, not at all; what I meant was that the Uniting Church uniquely in Australia, and especially in South Australia, seems to be in a self-destructive fit. That destructiveness is not the work of Holy Spirit, God is not tearing apart the Uniting Church and God is not tearing apart the holy catholic and apostolic Church beyond that. Rifts, schisms, breakings away, whatever they are called, are painful for God. Both the Uniting Church in Australia and its sister denominations in other parts of the world, and the Stone-Campbell Movement internationally, were established by Christians with hearts for unity and goodness, Godness, in the world. It is not in the nature of the Uniting Church with its Basis of Union, nor is it the nature of the sesquicentennial restoration movement which includes all believers in the slogan “No Creed but Christ”, to seek to divide the Body of Christ on any point of human thought, doctrine, theology, or opinion. Neither is it the work nor intention of God The Trinity, God The Community, and certainly not the unilateral activity of God The Holy Spirit to tear apart the community of God The Son.

So, how then is the Church being torn apart like it is, because no one can say that it isn’t? Well we’ve had the answer today haven’t we?  The Church is tearing itself apart because its people and its leaders have compromised their unmitigated trust in Jesus Christ. We, and I mean we rather than “they”, (this isn’t about a handful of suits and albs in Sydney or Adelaide), we are not listening to the prophets like Amos, like the Psalmist, like the Galilean. This isn’t about the orthodoxy of scriptural faithfulness, as if the Evangelicals are standing up for God and the Progressive are standing up against God, (and I dare you to say that to my face, or even in my hearing); neither is it about the orthopraxy of what actually would Jesus do, as if the Evangelicals are resisting the compassion of Christ and the Progressives are rejoicing in the compassion of Christ (and the same warning applies). And the thing is, it’s not just the Uniting Church in South Australia, or even nationally because it’s not just the Uniting Church…look at the kickback for and against Israel Folau just inside the Church. Think about the anguish expressed by some Christians when the Australian Christian Lobby took up the call to funds when gofundme.com shut it down. Whether you agree with Folau in his theology, and/or in his stance, (because it’s possible to stand with Bible truth without standing with the need to do it on Twitface), or whether you do not; and whether you respect “political correctness” or you think it’s “gone mad”, the conversation itself has got out of hand. The Church in its wings has moved outside grace, the people saved through trust in love and sent back into their neighbourhoods as agents of the King of the good Creation have become sidetracked, and the message is about to be lost.

We must not let that happen.

It may sound odd to hear the next sentence in the light of such passion, but there’s a reason for it. I am not going to take a stand and I am not going to call you to steadfastness. Not. There’s enough fighting in the world and in the Church, and in the church in the world and the world in the church, without KSSM publicly declaring a side.

The choice for salvation is yours says Paul in Colossians 1:23, now that you have become aware of what God is like through awareness of who Jesus Christ is. This is what we proclaim: not as a stand, not as a rampart, do not even attempt to assemble a barricade because that is not what God has called the Church to do in any era of Christian history. Popes yes, bishops and deacons far too often, local pastors all the bloody time, but never God. We are not taking a stand, but we are standing a stance: KSSM is the place where if you know you need God’s loving welcome you will find it.

This is not a house where we rush through Sunday to get to Monday and the more exciting life: we are not the Israel of Amos and we are not the Australia of the post-war years. We are a house of integrity, of respect, and ultimately of welcome. We are a house of truth and accountability to Christ and to the gospel. We are not a house of destruction but we are a true Bethel, a house of God.

Amen.

Rise in Power (Pentecost 5C)

This is the text of the message I prepared for KSSM for Sunday 14th July 2019, the fifth Sunday in Pentecost in Year C.

Amos 7:7-17; Psalm 82; Colossians 1:1-14

The Word for this week has been a delight to peruse.  That sounds happy doesn’t it?  It’s a bit odd really though, because as you know I tend to write my services about three weeks or so ahead, and so even though I’d standing here in front of you today happy and hearty, if not a little dusty after a week at Family Camp with the Servi Church mob, when I actually wrote this I’d just spent a week feel less happy and hearty, and a lot more dusty fighting off my second bout of Man Flu for 2019.  I had missed an important church meeting in Ararat because I’d been a) too sick to want to get up at stupid o’clock and minus stupid degrees Celsius to drive there, b) too sick to be out in public where I might contagion all over other people and make them sick, and c) too sick to pay much attention to what was being said anyway.  I was even too sick to get a Flu jab.  So when I finally sat down on my first day out of bed before ten o’clock, “delighting in the text” wasn’t on the agenda so much as “get something down because you’re going to be at Camp and you’ll not have time to write then”.  It was also KSSM council that evening so not only did I have to get something written that day, I didn’t have all day to do it.  Praise God for great Bible passages and inspiring messages from the Word in all God’s forms.

In our reading from the Hebrew traditions we come across the prophet Amos.  Now when I say prophet that’s more about hindsight than highlight, because Amos was nobody special in his day, and even in the action of what we read this morning he’s still a bit of a nobody.  Anyway, in the course of his being a nobody Amos sees and hears God in the act of testing Israel: God is doing a prophetic thing wherein Israel is being compared to a well-built wall and God is checking the angles and edges with a plumb-line. Bad news for Israel, and for Amos who oversees the examination, God finds that the wall (and hence the nation) is askew and God declares that it shall all be knocked down.  The nation of Israel shall be utterly destroyed, its king shall be slain, and its people shall be exiled.  Israel is broken beyond repair, it cannot be repaired, it never will be repaired, and so God is going to knock it all over and start again.  Cheers for listening Amos, says God, now go and tell the Israelites.  Bad news for Amos eh?  Well yes it is, especially since the religious elites and the professional clergy don’t like all this defeatist language and they tell Amos to take his words of judgement and go pronounce them against some other nation; Judah for example.  He is to clear out of Bethel because Beit-El, literally the House of God is the royal worship space and the religious elites and the professional clergy don’t want the king to be upset.  Amos’ response is that even as a religious nobody God has called him to speak truth, mainly because the religious elites and the professional clergy don‘t listen for God, they refuse to hear and therefore they cannot speak God’s message, and that because of this the whole nation will fall.  So to put all of that into one dot point, God will speak to God’s own people, but if the professional listeners won’t listen then God will tell someone humble enough to listen yet bold enough to speak.  For me as a leader, even a leader with clogged ears and a blogged doze, I need to notice when I am no longer hearing God speak because it might mean God has stopped trying to get though my facade of priestliness and is speaking to one of you, or even one of them, instead.  Good to remember.

Inspiring eh?  Well it was for me in my week of weakness because it reminded me that God has not stopped speaking to the Church, even if God needs to speak through someone lower down the pyramid.

The Psalm we read this morning is a demand for justice, but it needs to be read carefully.  The first time I read it I missed it, I missed who it was who is actually doing the talking, I didn’t see the 66’s and 99’s where they are and I thought this was another one of those “how long must we wait O Lord” prayers.  You know the ones, c’mon Lord the wicked are getting richer, the faithful are getting poorer, and it’s your job to intervene.  Good stuff, worth praying, is usually relevant.  But not always, and not this time, no this time it’s Godself doing the “how long must I wait O people”, declaring that it’s about time the people of God started to punish sin and wickedness and to vindicate and liberate the innocent and the good of all classes and nations.  This passage is a covenant lawsuit, it’s a contractual claim by God as one party upon the elders and rulers of the Abrahamic tribes as the other party to hold up Israel’s side of the covenant.  “You know better, so why are you allowing this gut-rotting oppression and suppression by the wicked of the faithful to set in?” asks God.  Israel is supposed to be God’s example of a true nation, they’re meant to be just and peaceable and to display the nature and character of God in the world, but God has found them to be corrupt and violent, exploitative and cruel, and certainly no better than the other nations even if they aren’t actually worse.  God has set us apart to set an example for the world, the plumb-line was set against the Church at its inception so as to be a straight and true representation of God in the world and each of us agents of the Kingdom.  What has God seen of Christians in recent times?  Is the Church light and salt?  If not, why not, and what are we going to do about it?  And what would happen if we didn’t?  The connection between Amos 7 and Psalm 82 is the plumbline, not the outcome; I know that many within the wider Uniting Church in particular disagree with me on this, but I don’t think God is about to destroy us and exile us.  However I do think we have got wonky and shifty, and I believe we need God to call us back to order, to attention, to straightness and steadfastness, and we need to listen to those down in the ranks who are declaring the words of God because those at the top echelon are not listening.

Inspiring eh?  Well again yes, God is still speaking to the Church and God is calling us to account for our discipleship.  Our issue is not that we are failing to meet together or that we are not doing enough Bible Study, singing, tithing, or even evangelism, but that we are living in a dark and cold and cruel world and at the very least we are doing little to remedy it and at the very worst we look dark and cruel and cold ourselves.  God’s word to us is simple: love and be more loving in the way you go about it.  That’s a command I’m busting to follow.

Our story from the Christian tradition is the culmination of this push toward faithfulness as evidenced in the brightness of the light we shine.  In the opening thoughts of his letter Paul is thankful to God for the people of Colossae and especially the loving-kindness of the Colossian church (Colossians 1:4).  He speaks to them about their reputation particularly because he has never met them: Paul never went to Colossae, so he’s using his reputation as an apostle to presume to write to them, and he comments in opening on their reputation as a bit of an ice-breaker.  “Okay mob”, he says, “so we’ve never met each other, but we each know about the other and here’s what I know about you, your reputation is a good one and especially so in the areas of hospitality and hope.  I don’t know your actual names and I’ve never been to your town, let alone your church, but I do know this one fact about you, I know that not only have you heard the gospel you are now living it out.  Onya!  The gospel that is flowering all across Asia and Macedonia is flowering also in you: praise be to God and thanks be to Epaphras who told you about Jesus.  You listened, you learned, and now you are living and leading in life.  Onya!  And may the odds be ever in your favour, because trouble will come.”

The key characteristic of the Colossians seems to be their hope, that’s what Paul knuckles down on in his praise of them.  Not only do they love each other and not only are they diligent in the discipleship tasks of prayer and fellowship, they are keenly so as people with everlasting, abundant hope.  The Colossians seem to be to be John 10:10 people, people who are living abundantly because they know that they are loved by God, a God who will never abandon them and who is directing their present toward a glorious future.  This seems especially so, says Paul in Colossians 1:13-14, in the case of sins which might otherwise hold us back in life.  The Colossians alongside all Christians are forgiven people, freed to pursue God and the fullness of life in God because of Christ and their trust in Christ’s word and work.

So what are we to do?  How much of this are we to take to heart here, today, in Kaniva and Serviceton?  I think the answer is all of it, we are to take all of it to heart and we are to overlook none of it.  As I say I don’t think Amos’ prophecy to Israel applies to us directly, God is not about to exile us and slay our kings, but the prophetic symbol of the plumbline and the prophetic declaration of the wall being skewed is noteworthy.  We are not as tall or as square as we should be; the Church is off kilter and it has been for generations.  For all of the vitriol we see in the media, secular and religious, for all that generates vast amounts of heat and chafing but very little light, there are truths in the rumours.  The Church has let down families, let down children, let down Christians, let down the world, let down itself, let down God.  Not every priest in all of Christendom is a paedophile, much as it seems that Twitface seems to suggest it at times, but the gut-ripping truth is that many priests were and some still are.  Sinners are damned without Christ, no matter the nature of their sin, but all are received with grace and such an indescribable bounty of love if all they do is lift their eyes in longing to the one who saves through the cross; but Twitface only reads the first three words (sinners are damned) and the cross is pilloried.  Is this Twitface’s fault?  In the sense of its users, yes, there is a lot of intolerance in the world and the secularists are just as militant as the inquisitors and the crusaders were back in Christian past: but with the stories of the Inquisition and the Crusades, and without the story of the cross and the empty tomb, what do we expect?  Honestly and really, I’m not the black armband type and I don’t believe that the Church has brought upon itself everything it is reaping right now, but when even God holds a plumbline against us and we are found divergent, crooked, bent, and…you get the point…what hope does our light have?

Our only hope is that our light, like the light of Amos and the Colossians, is the light of God.  Shine brightly people of God, do not allow yourself to be extinguished because God demands our luminescence: but God is also our own love and hope, and so long as we shine with Christ then Christ will shine for us.

Amen.